GIRLS’ EDUCATION: AN EFFECTIVE WAY TO FIGHT POVERTY

“There is no instrument of development more effective than the education of girls in Diploma of IT. »
Kofi Annan, ex-Secretary of the United Nations.

An educated girl

can more easily make their voice heard and participate in decision-making at all levels as well as in the evolution of the society in which they live has a better chance of getting out of poverty and accessing an income-generating activity for themselves and their family.

participates more actively in the development of his country. If we increase girls’ school attendance by 10%, the gross domestic product (GDP) of a country increases by an average of 3%, finds it easier to access and follow prevention and care recommendations and advice for herself and their children; understand the value of giving their children a quality education diploma of information technology dares to resist a project of early marriage and knows the existence of means of contraception.

PLAN INTERNATIONAL IS COMMITTED TO GIRLS’ EDUCATION

Since 2007, Plan International has been working specifically in favor of girls’ rights. Plan International’s advocacy with international bodies has led to an important breakthrough: in 2012, the UN officially recognized October 11 as the International Day of the Girl Child.

More information on our page dedicated to girls’ rights

An international solidarity NGO, Plan International works in 56 developing countries to give the most marginalized children and young people the means to build their future. Plan International France is a member of the Don en Confiance Charter Committee, an organization that approves and monitors associations and foundations that appeal to the generosity of the public.

THE MINE PREVENTED ME FROM BELIEVING IN MYSELF BUT THE SCHOOL GAVE ME A SECOND WIND

In Tanzania, the minimum legal working age is 14, and the average age for mining is 18. However, more than 70% of children aged 5 to 17 work. Plan International works with working children to get them out of this illegal situation and reintegrate them into school. Discover the story of 11-year-old Limi, who had to go to work in the mine to survive before being helped by Plan International.

“My name is Limi. I am 11 years old and I live with my mum and my 2-year-old little brother Oscar in the Geita region. Before, I went to work in the gold mine next to the house with my mom. I worked in the mine every morning, then I went to school in the afternoon. But on Saturday and Sunday, I worked all day at the mine. I was very tired when I finished my day. I often had back pain and sometimes even had trouble breathing. One day I heard that the mine was dangerous for my health and that of other children because of the mercury that we use without being protected.

When I was not at the mine or school, I took care of my little brother who often fell ill. He even caught malaria one day. Mom and I were very worried. Especially since Oscar often stayed home alone while we were at the mine. It scared me to leave him alone, something could happen to him…but mom and I had no choice.

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